Legacies and Legends

Well, this is truly the beginning of the end of the beginning.

As December draws near I look at my body of work and I am feeling quite sad – not for having the opportunity to complete my work under the guidance of professionals – but for the fact that I wanted to accomplish so much more in this time.

I set out on my creative journey when I was barely in primary school – my older brothers would read lots of books and comics, and draw amazing pictures – and it was from there that I began to write and draw.

I wish I had kept some of my earlier work – although I’m sure I’d be cringing at the crudity of my craft – but every journey has a first step.

What I never anticipated was taking another million steps from there – and still facing uncertainty. I thought a smaller, more unique country would allow better opportunities to realise my dreams – but it has been a struggle fraught with ignorance on my part. When you’re younger, you tend to wait for the world to come to you – for publishers to burst through your door, wanting to sign you up because you’re so damned special – and when that fails to happen you begin to door-knock. You don’t knock on everyone’s door – you kind of test the waters by dipping a toe – and when that first frosty reception alarms and frightens you, you withdraw from the water’s edge and bide your time.

So I’ve been sitting at the water’s edge, casting stones, and refining my work – but I should have been more aggressive and personal with my work. I can say that I have seen some of my ideas appear in other people’s work – not because they stole them, but because ideas are continually floating through the air – and are plucked and harvested by gifted people with a flare for creativity and a vision to achieve.

I’ve been sitting by the water’s edge too long.

I am part-Maori, part-Croatian, part-European – but if you look at me you would definitely say I am a Maori – and when people ask where I am from I say Pamapuria – not Scotland, Wales or Croatia. I am not rejecting that side – I truly embrace my unique heritage – but when I look in the mirror I see Maori, and when I step out into the world people treat me as Maori.

As a Maori, I have always felt like I needed to prove myself – like the world was measuring me up and waving the bigger stick. This was not bred into me by my parents – this was an internal mechanism that was triggered by years of watching the news and watching social events unfold. But I have always had a profound sense of pride in my history, and wanted to do more to lift my wavering spirit in the face of mounting statistics that told the nation Maori had higher levels of unemployment and less chance of success in the business world.

Sure, my mother and father provided for me as I provide for my children now, but I have always desired to achieve beyond everyday success – the kind of success I label “frequent-normalcy” – going to work, buying a house, putting food on the table and clothes on our backs. We don’t celebrate that enough – but I desire more.
When I was home and visiting the local cemetery, I asked my father about a headstone that bore our family name – he said it was a great-uncle of his but he could not tell me any more. I realised at that moment that for all the years this man had spent on this earth – whether good or bad – his experiences are lost for all time. He had become a chunk of stone propped up in the ground with hardly a memory to carry him on into the future.

Was this to be my fate – to be remembered for a generation or two and then fade into obscurity? To become a cold block of marble with faded letters?

We might mention some folk with fond memory – whilst others live on in books and history – but most will live in this life and fade from the world without leaving a trace.

Not me – I want to be remembered long after my great grandchildren join me in the next life, and I want to be remembered as someone who inspired others to do the same. For all our big talk and backslapping in admiration of our cultural identity, we have barely scratched the surface of what we can achieve as a people.

I can’t sit at the water’s edge and watch while others have all the fun – I’m going to jump in and get wet.

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