Eru shares snippets of past and present

I’ve recently had broadband connected at my house. The digital revolution finally revolved its way to my place, flashing its light speed optics in my direction. It was a bit of a mission. First of all Telecom refused to set up an account in my name. I have a credit history as peppery as the spice trade so I had to call Mum. From my cell phone.

From her bed – where she receives all phone calls – she considered my request. I lowered my bait in slowly. She agreed that it was nice to hear from me. It had been awhile. She agreed that it’s Great News I’m being paid to write a manuscript. She agreed that there would be a lot of emailing back and forth between me and my mentor. She slowly agreed that it was a bit of a hassle to have to email from work. She supposed that it would be much easier to have a phone line and internet connection at home.

Then we shared a pause.

“So would you mind if I got my landline connected? ‘Cause of my…past it would have to be under your name,  Mum?”

I’d asked her before but she had been very reluctant. This time however I felt like I had some leverage.

“This is my best shot to finally get a novel published.”

I heard the bed springs creak. The air grew rich with anticipation.

“Ok then”.

It seems Archimedes may have been right: “Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it and I shall move the world.”

*

Mum’s gesture of support meant a lot to me. I do not come from a family of readers.  Sure, we had lots of books in our home but they fell into two categories: scriptures and commentaries on the scriptures. Reading wasn’t really a hobby, or a pleasure -it was a duty, one to be carried out on the Sabbath and during weekly gospel study sessions.  We escaped the ordinariness of everyday life through television or sport or food. Reading for pleasure was seen as a bit suspicious, a bit indulgent.  I got the impression that the proper function of reading was to prepare oneself for The Great and Final Day of Judgement.

The only reading exception seemed to be Dad’s Herald Tribune -Hawkes Bay’s daily paper. And it was definitely Dad’s paper. No one was allowed to even unfold the paper before Dad had carefully thumbed through it. He had a pair of scissors as long as his forearm and as sharp as his temper. He used those glimmering scissors to carefully snip out the articles of interest to him, mostly stock market reports on how well his tiny portfolio of Brierley stocks were doing and anything to do with the Meat Workers Union, of which he was a representative.  When Dad was done anyone was welcome to read the paper, so long as they could hold it together with its dozen or so rectangular shaped gaps. No one else read the paper. It was too much hard work.

I’m not sure then how I ended up as the family’s reader, the one child of seventeen who preferred to be indoors flicking through non-church approved books.  The one child of seventeen who seemed allergic to the outdoors but drawn to the inches thick illusions between covers.

Fiction and secular non-fiction became the lever and fulcrum on which I shifted my world view.

*

So now that I have all the necessary shiny cables and light speed currents pointed at my house I wish I could tell that I’ve been very noble with my Broadband. I wish I could tell you that I’ve spent the last two months downloading pirated eBooks on The Art of Writing. I wish I could tell you that I’ve set up RSS feeds to past Nobel Literature winners. I wish I could brag at how many Booker Prize winners I’ve friended on Facebook.

In truth I’ve watched hours, probably days worth of Reality TV. ‘Celebrity Rehab’, ‘The Real Housewives of New Jersey’, ‘Flava of Love’, ‘Sober House with Dr. Drew’ and even ‘Keeping Up With the Kardashians’. I’ve devoured hours and hours of celebrities and ordinary folks lose weight and sober up. I’ve watched the famous and the forgettable falling in and out of love -with themselves and with each other. I’ve watched people climb on the dry wagon and fall off again only to be run over and crushed under wheels of hubris. And most of all watched I’ve watched them Fight. Jill vs. Bethenney, Danielle vs. Teresa or Sergeant Harvey vs. Fat Celebrity has-beens. I’ve streamed hours of quiet tension explode in moments the loudest vile. I am ashamed to admit it, but I’ve loved seeing ex-lovers collapse into one-on-one war.

*

During the writing of this manuscript I have often killed my own momentum with the question: “What right do you have to tell this story”. It has stopped me dead on several occasions.

I’m not the kind of author that could write the story of a seventeenth century Dutch lesbian widow. As fun as it is to imagine myself outside of myself I doubt I could convince a reader. God bless the authors who don’t write from experience. I can’t. I am a doubting and easily wounded 30-year old single Māori. Experience has worn away my capacity to trust. I act with kindness not out of any higher moral calling, but because it seems to disarm and pacify most other adults.  I’d prefer to be arrogant and straightforward but I’ve found I’m not pretty enough to pull that off.

I am pulling this manuscript out like a series of splinters. It is not easy but some internal pressure is telling me that it is significant and necessary. Sometimes I even chance across an unexpected and lovely paragraph. What I am making is part autobiography, part fiction and part fantasy. It is a crossover of scripture, Dad’s paper and what was left of the newspaper. You, the reader, will be expected to hold it all together, to keep the pages upright enough to make sense of it. The rectangular shaped gaps will be both your challenge and your chance to hide away with me. The value of the Brierley stocks will be up to you.

 December the 3rd, the Great and Terrible Day of Judgement approaches.

4 comments

  • EJ! I was just thinking about you and stumbled on this from your Facebook. Look at you! I am so impressed and I can’t wait to read it, obviously. Once you are done writing we should catch up on the last 5 years. XOXO from America.

  • Oh my gosh! You left me in stitches in one paragraph and then made me thoughtful in the next. I have no doubt you will publish a book whose texts entertain and provoke the world over!

  • You are in the car on the way!!! Now that you are 30 you are driving, if get sidetracked by all the pretty lights – thats ok, it will make for a much more interesting ride!!!

  • Too Funny Eru.
    I am serious when I say, I can’t wait to read your book!!

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